"Perfekt!" exclaimed Willi, course leader at AFZ Rostock. I had managed to extinguish the fire he’d deliberately started after pouring petrol into a metal box. Dressed in fireman’s protective clothing, our group was given instructions on how to fight a blaze with foam, powder, CO2 extinguishers and - in this case - a fire blanket.

The fun didn’t stop there, oh no. Four days of intensive safety and security training including a dip in the harbour, wearing a cold water immersion suit and using an evacuation chute. The course is designed for sea-faring service crew with four theory tests and various practical exercises. 


Starting at 8am and running till 6pm with just an hour for lunch, it was pretty intensive. The course was in German, with multiple choice tests in English which everyone passed with flying colours. I got to know a few of my colleagues a bit better and although it was pretty exhausting, my German is refreshed and all in all it was very informative and enjoyable.

At first convinced it was a joke, I was dreading the harbour swim. Flashing my Rescue Swimmer and CPR certificates, I tried my hardest to be exempted, but in the end I was glad I wasn’t: the weather was glorious yesterday - the other groups weren’t so lucky. Our huge immersion suits meant that we could keep clothes on and - if desired - shoes, too. The suits were warm, watertight and the attached life jacket acted like a pillow, meaning we could just lie back and float around in total bliss.

The various exercises included a swimming in a collective line - on our backs with legs wide open, clinching the next swimmer between our thighs (far less sensual that suggested owing to immense thickness of the neoprene plus a layer of clothing underneath); forming a survival ‘waffle’ - head to toe with arms positioned over the next swimmers’ legs; climbing on to a life raft and then jumping into the water from the quay: it was low tide, so at least 2m50. Great fun - I could’ve floated around all day.

The evacuation chute was also an adrenaline rush, and besides all this, I also got to pilot a fast rescue boat (saving a ‘person over board’ in the shape of a life ring) and watch my team mates set off flares.

In the evenings, my ritual included a walk through the nearby allotments (see photo): “richtig in Ordnung” with blossoming trees, tulips and neatly sowed beds. 

Now safely back in Hamburg with five certificates under my belt and ready to return to the keyboard tomorrow morning.

After arriving in Rostock, I checked into my hotel and then went back to the S-Bahn station because I wanted to head north to Warnemünde and the Baltic.

A trip to the beach means crossing the Unterwarnow estuary by ferry. This cargo ship was being pulled by a tug on its way to Rostock.

image

A stiff wind was blowing - not ideal beach weather, and where are the high dunes? The nearby spa resort - seemingly full of little old ladies with dogs - offers these quaint canopies. No takers today:


image

The ferry back was more entertaining, with another large vessel - this time a car ferry, perhaps from Denmark:

image

A last look back at the Hohe Düne spa resort:

image

image

A ray of sunshine - captured with my brand-spanking new Lenovo Yoga 13” returnable laptop/tablet - on the way to Rostock with Deutsche Bahn. Fun to use, the tablet is also great for reading all the scores I have to learn, rather than lugging six kilos of paper around.

Today I drank my first beer in a week. Unlike Hawaii, Hamburg is a mecca for beer, but I began my sixth decade on this Earth as I intend to go on: everything in moderation and only as often as necessary.Each morning, I take the U-Bahn to St Pauli where I alight and head down the Reeperbahn under the watchful gaze of Bismarck towering above the tags and blossoming trees. Today, I just managed to avoid a nasty patch of vomit on the pavement: another poor victim of a hard day’s night in this, the seediest part of the city.
Otherwise, it’s a joy. The public transport system is faultless: cheap, functional, dependable and no awkward barriers. Trust is key. In two weeks, there have been no encounters with security agents checking for valid tickets. Of course, I have my prepaid Fahrkarte.As well as enjoying a beer, I’ve been shopping. After a fairly long period of inactivity and waiting for the right job, I’ve been wearing the same clothes and shoes for what seems an eternity. Here too, the shops seem to function far more on trust than in the UK: no limit to how many items in the changing rooms and no assistant handing out large plastic tags. Just up the road from my lodgings is Wandsbek Markt. There’s a huge mall with everything you could wish for - or maybe not. And around the corner there is perhaps the finest second-hand shop in the EU. Tomorrow, I’m going to Rostock to see the high dunes and, more importantly, to attend a sea-farers safety course.  Today I drank my first beer in a week. Unlike Hawaii, Hamburg is a mecca for beer, but I began my sixth decade on this Earth as I intend to go on: everything in moderation and only as often as necessary.Each morning, I take the U-Bahn to St Pauli where I alight and head down the Reeperbahn under the watchful gaze of Bismarck towering above the tags and blossoming trees. Today, I just managed to avoid a nasty patch of vomit on the pavement: another poor victim of a hard day’s night in this, the seediest part of the city.
Otherwise, it’s a joy. The public transport system is faultless: cheap, functional, dependable and no awkward barriers. Trust is key. In two weeks, there have been no encounters with security agents checking for valid tickets. Of course, I have my prepaid Fahrkarte.As well as enjoying a beer, I’ve been shopping. After a fairly long period of inactivity and waiting for the right job, I’ve been wearing the same clothes and shoes for what seems an eternity. Here too, the shops seem to function far more on trust than in the UK: no limit to how many items in the changing rooms and no assistant handing out large plastic tags. Just up the road from my lodgings is Wandsbek Markt. There’s a huge mall with everything you could wish for - or maybe not. And around the corner there is perhaps the finest second-hand shop in the EU. Tomorrow, I’m going to Rostock to see the high dunes and, more importantly, to attend a sea-farers safety course. 

Today I drank my first beer in a week. Unlike Hawaii, Hamburg is a mecca for beer, but I began my sixth decade on this Earth as I intend to go on: everything in moderation and only as often as necessary.

Each morning, I take the U-Bahn to St Pauli where I alight and head down the Reeperbahn under the watchful gaze of Bismarck towering above the tags and blossoming trees. Today, I just managed to avoid a nasty patch of vomit on the pavement: another poor victim of a hard day’s night in this, the seediest part of the city.


Otherwise, it’s a joy. The public transport system is faultless: cheap, functional, dependable and no awkward barriers. Trust is key. In two weeks, there have been no encounters with security agents checking for valid tickets. Of course, I have my prepaid Fahrkarte.

As well as enjoying a beer, I’ve been shopping. After a fairly long period of inactivity and waiting for the right job, I’ve been wearing the same clothes and shoes for what seems an eternity. Here too, the shops seem to function far more on trust than in the UK: no limit to how many items in the changing rooms and no assistant handing out large plastic tags. 

Just up the road from my lodgings is Wandsbek Markt. There’s a huge mall with everything you could wish for - or maybe not. And around the corner there is perhaps the finest second-hand shop in the EU. 

Tomorrow, I’m going to Rostock to see the high dunes and, more importantly, to attend a sea-farers safety course. 

Hamburg. When I checked in, the woman at the desk told me the flight had a 30 minute delay. However a miracle occurred: our plane took off at 2pm on the dot and we landed ten minutes ahead of schedule. Then, one of the longest queues for passport control I’ve seen for ages, not unlike Sharm El Sheikh airport in the days before the Arab Spring when tourism in the Red Sea resort was booming. Finally, after taking one S-Bahn and two U-Bahn trains, I managed to get to my hotel with 15 minutes to spare. The receptionist kindly carried my suitcase to the third floor and I arrived for my interview just in time.  * Although the sun was shining earlier in the day, there is a cold wind. The DOM carnival fun fair is set up just behind the Reeperbahn – it puts Blackpool to shame. As for wattage output – think mini Vegas, with added Currywurst and the largest Küchen in the world.  Along the Reeperbahn - although sadly I missed the Beatles - I’m grateful to have been exposed to the teachings of Islam regards diverting one’s gaze. The only other women are with boyfriends, together in groups or else hookers. I feel sorry for these girls standing in the cold.  My diverted gaze is by far the best approach for avoiding any harassment. Only one man standing outside some seedy joint briefly tries to grab my attention; I walk on unperturbed, except for the fact that the man is dark-skinned: Iraqi? Muslim? I don’t know. But I do know that I have the right not to be harassed and I feel sure that the men touting for business know it, too. This is the EU. Tomorrow, I’m going to visit an old friend in Hildesheim who has a piano. I have four days to learn Es gibt kein Bier auf Hawaii. Prost! Hamburg. When I checked in, the woman at the desk told me the flight had a 30 minute delay. However a miracle occurred: our plane took off at 2pm on the dot and we landed ten minutes ahead of schedule. Then, one of the longest queues for passport control I’ve seen for ages, not unlike Sharm El Sheikh airport in the days before the Arab Spring when tourism in the Red Sea resort was booming. Finally, after taking one S-Bahn and two U-Bahn trains, I managed to get to my hotel with 15 minutes to spare. The receptionist kindly carried my suitcase to the third floor and I arrived for my interview just in time.  * Although the sun was shining earlier in the day, there is a cold wind. The DOM carnival fun fair is set up just behind the Reeperbahn – it puts Blackpool to shame. As for wattage output – think mini Vegas, with added Currywurst and the largest Küchen in the world.  Along the Reeperbahn - although sadly I missed the Beatles - I’m grateful to have been exposed to the teachings of Islam regards diverting one’s gaze. The only other women are with boyfriends, together in groups or else hookers. I feel sorry for these girls standing in the cold.  My diverted gaze is by far the best approach for avoiding any harassment. Only one man standing outside some seedy joint briefly tries to grab my attention; I walk on unperturbed, except for the fact that the man is dark-skinned: Iraqi? Muslim? I don’t know. But I do know that I have the right not to be harassed and I feel sure that the men touting for business know it, too. This is the EU. Tomorrow, I’m going to visit an old friend in Hildesheim who has a piano. I have four days to learn Es gibt kein Bier auf Hawaii. Prost!

Hamburg. When I checked in, the woman at the desk told me the flight had a 30 minute delay. However a miracle occurred: our plane took off at 2pm on the dot and we landed ten minutes ahead of schedule. Then, one of the longest queues for passport control I’ve seen for ages, not unlike Sharm El Sheikh airport in the days before the Arab Spring when tourism in the Red Sea resort was booming.

Finally, after taking one S-Bahn and two U-Bahn trains, I managed to get to my hotel with 15 minutes to spare. The receptionist kindly carried my suitcase to the third floor and I arrived for my interview just in time.

*

Although the sun was shining earlier in the day, there is a cold wind. The DOM carnival fun fair is set up just behind the Reeperbahn – it puts Blackpool to shame. As for wattage output – think mini Vegas, with added Currywurst and the largest Küchen in the world.

Along the Reeperbahn - although sadly I missed the Beatles - I’m grateful to have been exposed to the teachings of Islam regards diverting one’s gaze. The only other women are with boyfriends, together in groups or else hookers. I feel sorry for these girls standing in the cold.

My diverted gaze is by far the best approach for avoiding any harassment. Only one man standing outside some seedy joint briefly tries to grab my attention; I walk on unperturbed, except for the fact that the man is dark-skinned: Iraqi? Muslim? I don’t know. But I do know that I have the right not to be harassed and I feel sure that the men touting for business know it, too. This is the EU.

Tomorrow, I’m going to visit an old friend in Hildesheim who has a piano. I have four days to learn Es gibt kein Bier auf Hawaii. Prost!


What a surprise: Shitrit trolling again…

Dahab dogs Dahab dogs Dahab dogs Dahab dogs Dahab dogs Dahab dogs Dahab dogs
Perfect weather for hill walking over the past few days. Rather muddy in places, but clear blue, cloudless skies are rare in these parts: difficult to stay indoors.  Perfect weather for hill walking over the past few days. Rather muddy in places, but clear blue, cloudless skies are rare in these parts: difficult to stay indoors.  Perfect weather for hill walking over the past few days. Rather muddy in places, but clear blue, cloudless skies are rare in these parts: difficult to stay indoors.  Perfect weather for hill walking over the past few days. Rather muddy in places, but clear blue, cloudless skies are rare in these parts: difficult to stay indoors.  Perfect weather for hill walking over the past few days. Rather muddy in places, but clear blue, cloudless skies are rare in these parts: difficult to stay indoors.  Perfect weather for hill walking over the past few days. Rather muddy in places, but clear blue, cloudless skies are rare in these parts: difficult to stay indoors.  Perfect weather for hill walking over the past few days. Rather muddy in places, but clear blue, cloudless skies are rare in these parts: difficult to stay indoors.  Perfect weather for hill walking over the past few days. Rather muddy in places, but clear blue, cloudless skies are rare in these parts: difficult to stay indoors.  Perfect weather for hill walking over the past few days. Rather muddy in places, but clear blue, cloudless skies are rare in these parts: difficult to stay indoors.  Perfect weather for hill walking over the past few days. Rather muddy in places, but clear blue, cloudless skies are rare in these parts: difficult to stay indoors. 

Perfect weather for hill walking over the past few days. Rather muddy in places, but clear blue, cloudless skies are rare in these parts: difficult to stay indoors. 

#Manchester #LeftBank #ManchesterCivilJusticCentre #PeoplesHistoryMuseum #BeneathItsFolds with @QuietLoner and @Longfellapoet #Manchester #LeftBank #ManchesterCivilJusticCentre #PeoplesHistoryMuseum #BeneathItsFolds with @QuietLoner and @Longfellapoet #Manchester #LeftBank #ManchesterCivilJusticCentre #PeoplesHistoryMuseum #BeneathItsFolds with @QuietLoner and @Longfellapoet #Manchester #LeftBank #ManchesterCivilJusticCentre #PeoplesHistoryMuseum #BeneathItsFolds with @QuietLoner and @Longfellapoet #Manchester #LeftBank #ManchesterCivilJusticCentre #PeoplesHistoryMuseum #BeneathItsFolds with @QuietLoner and @Longfellapoet #Manchester #LeftBank #ManchesterCivilJusticCentre #PeoplesHistoryMuseum #BeneathItsFolds with @QuietLoner and @Longfellapoet

#Manchester #LeftBank #ManchesterCivilJusticCentre #PeoplesHistoryMuseum #BeneathItsFolds with @QuietLoner and @Longfellapoet

nevver:

Movie Matinée 
nevver:

Movie Matinée 
nevver:

Movie Matinée

YadbYadUK is a hasbara cyberbullying operation set up by the woman who claims I am harassing her: the person tweeting in the inset - Mrs Ambrosine Shitrit: ‘I am not anti-Muslim’

Shitrit claims that anyone who is anti-Israel is forcibly an anti-Semite. If someone opposes her diabolical views, she will smear, set up countless sockpuppet accounts with intent to harass and then play victim.

According to sources, followers of her organisation’s Twitter accounts (there are several) are 80% fake. Ditto, regards her ‘personal’ accounts @Mrs_Shitrit and @IsraelDemocracy. Shitrit once tried to have a Twitter opponent sacked from his job after she’d set up a fake troll account, pretending to be someone else trolling the same man. Here’s another of Shitrit’s sock accounts, set up to harass a woman and her husband.


To be continued…

The page in the photo belongs to a woman who claims I’m harassing her. Check my Storify page to find out why.

Twitter conversations become clearer thanks to Storify. Check latest instalments about the anti-bullying organisation which loves to bully, the 2014 Islamophobe of the Year Awarda and much more…